Buhari Appoints Four CBN Non-Executive Directors, Others

Buhari Appoints Four CBN Non-Executive Directors, Others

File photo: President Muhammadu Buhari

President Muhammadu Buhari has approved the appointment of four new non-executive directors for the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN).

The presidential approval was revealed in a statement on Friday by the Permanent Secretary (General Services Office) in the Office of the Secretary to the Government of the Federation.

According to the statement, the appointments are for an initial period of four years with effect from June 7, 2018.

The appointed CBN non-executive directors are Mr Adeola Adetunji, Professor Mike Obadan, Professor Justitia Nnabuko, and Professor Ummu Jalingo.

President Buhari also appointed Professor Abdullahi Yusuf at the chief medical director of the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, as well as Dr Pauline Ikwugbu as the provost of the Federal College of Education, Eha-Amufu in Enugu State.

Although both are for an initial period of four years, Professor Yusuf’s appointment is with effect from June 19, 2018, while that of Dr Ikwugbu is with effect from March 19, 2018.

Similarly, the President renewed the appointments of three rectors for their second and final term of four years.

The tenure of Dr Ogbonnia Ibe-Enwo of the Federal Polytechnic, Unwana Afikpo, in Ebonyi State was renewed with effect from August 7, 2018, while that of Mr Olusegun Aluko of the Federal Polytechnic, IIaro in Ogun State would take effect from September 25, 2018.

President Buhari also extended the term of Professor Sunday Onohaebi of National Institute of Construction Technology, Uromi, in Edo State with effect from July 25, 2018.

In the statement, he asked the appointees to regard their appointments as a call to national service.

The President also directed them to carry out their responsibilities with uprightness, diligence and prompt response to the yearnings of the public.

Moving lump in woman's face was a worm

Moving lump in woman's face was a worm

Get breaking news alerts and special reports. The news and stories that matter, delivered weekday mornings.

A woman mystified by itchy, moving lumps on her face got a surprising and somewhat horrifying diagnosis: they were made by a worm.

The 32-year-old woman likely caught the worm, a type of nematode, when she was bitten by mosquitoes in a rural area outside Moscow, her doctor said.

“She had first noted a nodule below her left eye. Five days later, it had moved to above her left eye, and 10 days after that to the upper lip,” Dr. Vladimir Kartashev of Rostov State Medical University in Russia wrote in a letter to the New England Journal of Medicine.

“She documented these changes by taking photographs of her face (i.e., ‘selfies’),” added Kartashev, who wrote in to describe the case along with parasitologist Fernando Simon of the University of Salamanca in Spain.

“The nodules occasionally caused a localized itching and burning sensation, but otherwise she had no symptoms.”

Doctors pulled the worm out and identified it as Dirofilaria repens, a type of nematode that usually affects animals such as dogs and cats. But mosquitoes can pick it up and carry it to people on occasion.

The parasite, a cousin of heartworm, is found in Europe, Africa and Asia and can grow to as long as six inches. It’s usually harmless, although it can cause an allergic reaction in animals.

Usually, the physical damage is minimal and pulling the worm out does the trick. But patients can sometimes have severe reactions. A German tourist developed a severe brain inflammation called meningoencephalitis after he caught the same species of parasite in India or Sri Lanka, according to a 2009 report.

Moving lump in woman's face was a worm

Moving lump in woman's face was a worm

Get breaking news alerts and special reports. The news and stories that matter, delivered weekday mornings.

A woman mystified by itchy, moving lumps on her face got a surprising and somewhat horrifying diagnosis: they were made by a worm.

The 32-year-old woman likely caught the worm, a type of nematode, when she was bitten by mosquitoes in a rural area outside Moscow, her doctor said.

“She had first noted a nodule below her left eye. Five days later, it had moved to above her left eye, and 10 days after that to the upper lip,” Dr. Vladimir Kartashev of Rostov State Medical University in Russia wrote in a letter to the New England Journal of Medicine.

“She documented these changes by taking photographs of her face (i.e., ‘selfies’),” added Kartashev, who wrote in to describe the case along with parasitologist Fernando Simon of the University of Salamanca in Spain.

“The nodules occasionally caused a localized itching and burning sensation, but otherwise she had no symptoms.”

Doctors pulled the worm out and identified it as Dirofilaria repens, a type of nematode that usually affects animals such as dogs and cats. But mosquitoes can pick it up and carry it to people on occasion.

The parasite, a cousin of heartworm, is found in Europe, Africa and Asia and can grow to as long as six inches. It’s usually harmless, although it can cause an allergic reaction in animals.

Usually, the physical damage is minimal and pulling the worm out does the trick. But patients can sometimes have severe reactions. A German tourist developed a severe brain inflammation called meningoencephalitis after he caught the same species of parasite in India or Sri Lanka, according to a 2009 report.

World Cup: Football fans nationwide in frenzy over Super Eagles victory

World Cup: Football fans nationwide in frenzy over Super Eagles victory

Soccer fans across the country were in a frenzy as they celebrated the 2-0 victory of the Super Eagles against Iceland in the ongoing World Cup in Russia on Friday.

Ahmed Musa got a brace for the Eagles in the second half of the game.

Reacting to the victory, Mr Austin Ajayi, Chairman, Sports Writers Association of Nigeria (SWAN), Adamawa chapter, disclosed in Yola that the Super Eagles played to the expectations of the people.

Ajayi said that the strength displayed had given hope that Nigeria would win Argentina in their final First Round match.

He also commended Coach Gernot Rohr for listening to public comments after the match against Croatia and re-organising his team to record the desired result.

Similarly, Mr Emmanuel Zira, the Chairman, Adamawa United Football Club, said that the victory did not come as a surprise.

Zira said that the team learnt from its mistakes during the previous match, adding that they played with more zeal to win.

According to him, there is hope for the team “to go places’’ if they can sustain this very tempo.

In Enugu, former Super Eagles Coach Christian Chukwu described the victory as “fantastic’’.

Chukwu said that the Super Eagles showed “who we are and what we are really made of as Nigerians — a hard fighting people.

“Moses and Musa are the kings of the game as they displayed mastery today.

“Musa has made our day today and lifted our spirits high,’’ he said.

Chukwu, a former captain of the Super Eagles, urged Nigerians to celebrate the victory.

He, however, cautioned that Nigeria’s match against Argentina was crucial but expressed optimism that the Super Eagles would be victorious.

“I personally believe that the Super Eagles have all it takes to beat the Argentine team.

“For me, the Argentine team is beatable and Super Eagles must beat them.’’

In Calabar, a journalist, Mr David Odey, described the performance as ‘spectacular’, saying that it had rekindled the hope of the team.

He said that the team would go far in the tournament if they replicated the same performance against Argentina.

“The coach needs to get his acts right by picking the players that will be able to defeat Argentina and progress to the knockout stage of the tournament,” he said.

Similarly, Mrs Janet Okon, a civil servant, congratulated the Super Eagles for the victory.

Okon said that the victory had wiped away the tears of many Nigerians from the previous loss against Croatia.

“It was a wonderful performance. You can see the unity and oneness among Nigerians worldwide.

“I can tell you now that every Nigerian is excited with this defeat against Iceland,” she said.

Also reacting, student, Mr Paul Abang, predicted that the Super Eagles would beat Argentina if only they improved on their standard of play.

In Uyo, Aniefiok Udonquak, Chairman Correspondents Chapel of the Nigeria Union of Journalists in Akwa Ibom, noted that the Super Eagles played with vigour and determination in the second half of the match.

“The confidence exhibited in the second half gave the Super Eagles the deserving victory.

“It would have been very disappointing for the giant of Africa if we had lost the match.’’

He said the Uyo fans hoped that the Super Eagles would continue with the spirit of doggedness in the next match against Argentina on Tuesday.

Also speaking, a football lover and analyst, Inemesit Akpan-Nsoh, said that the Super Eagles victory against Iceland would silence critics, who did not expect the boys to score any goal in the tournament.

He urged the Super Eagles replicate to duplicate the same zeal and stamina in their subsequent match.

“I am optimistic that with today’s victory, Nigeria will get to the round of 16 in the 2018 World Cup.

“Nigerians must be optimistic and pray for the success of the team in the next match,” Akpan-Nsoh said.

Source: PM News

Speech By John Momoh At The 2018 IPI World Congress

Speech By John Momoh At The 2018 IPI World Congress

File photo: Chairman, Channels Media Group, Mr John Momoh (OON)

A speech titled ‘Africa Is Looking To The Future. So Is Its Journalism’, presented by the Chairman, Channels Media Group, Mr John Momoh (OON), at the 2018 International Press Institute (IPI) World Congress in Abuja, Nigeria’s capital.

Read the full text below;

It’s an honour and privilege to be here this afternoon, to share this hall with you and to share

my thoughts about the future of journalism. To say that these are extraordinary times for the news industry, will be an understatement. These are incredibly phenomenal, and prodigiously extraordinary – times.

You don’t have to be a news junkie to notice that your daily news has undergone a transformation. There’s a complete disturbance, a complete disordering, a disarrangement, and indeed, a disarranging of the way we do our business.

We now have new markets with new set of values that now threaten existing markets. You call it a Disruption. I choose to call it, an Upheaval; an upheaval caused as you well know by the internet, which has now turned journalism upside down – making it more participatory, social, diverse and partisan.

We now live in a world where Journalism is being transformed, in the ways that news is produced, distributed, and used. New tools, and new practices, are affecting the ways we produce information.

New facts are being unearthed on a daily basis; we now have more audience feedback being integrated into our news production; more voices being heard; and more diverse perspectives are being presented on the same news stories.

Invariably, more stories are now available and archived, and searchable for longer periods of time. More people are now engaged more actively with the goings-on in the world—by taking photos, making videos, commenting on blogs and sharing the stories that matter to them.

Television newscasts now include amateur videos, covering events like the Arab spring or the African migrant crisis. Such videos, with their shaky cameras and people’s unguarded reactions, have much greater immediacy than professional footage.

Twitter, the microblogging service, has been integrated into coverage of events, no less the ongoing FIFA World Cup in Russia. At no time in the history of journalism have citizens become more engaged in reporting their own stories; as the man on the street assumes the role of a news reporter.

In essence, Streaming Video is changing every existing relationship in the TV value chain. Gone are those the days when right holders rely only on broadcast networks to air their content, and when networks rely only on Pay TV to deliver their content to viewers at home. Look around you, and you’ll see the new kids on the lock – the Digital Titans, all with their fangs out, ready to devour you – Facebook, Amazon Prime, Netflix, And Google.

For the print, the story isn’t different. Most newspapers have now migrated online, necessitated by the decline in readership, and unable to keep up with up-to-the-second news that are now available on the computer or on your phone applications.

And since they now put all of their content online for free, then there’s no incentive for readers to buy the print version. And so advertising revenue has been greatly undermined, making news reports a commodity, and blurring the boundaries between previously distinct news organisations.

The internet has overturned newspapers’ traditional business model, just as it has, for the broadcast industry.

There’s still no fool proof formula for turning digital news into profits. Paywalls, freemium/premium models, a la carte micropayments systems, are all being tried, which leaves newspapers at the mercy of the FANGs. In the meanwhile, newspapers and their websites have continued to slash their staff strength.

Social media, which many had hoped will be a saviour with its open access and extensive reach, has actually compounded the problem of journalism, by rewarding speed and sensation, over accuracy.

As one writer puts it, while it is true that “if you’re first and wrong, you are not first”, those who are making money from fake news, don’t really care. Fake news content, is now reported to generate more user interaction, than real journalism.

All these experiences – fake news, new business models and the growing realisation that platforms are not just platforms, have resulted in a perfect storm, which shows that we are really, at an inflexion point as an industry.

Now, some say this is a crisis of journalism; Perhaps. But we see it as an explosion of the profession, and an opportunity toward better journalism.

We believe that journalism is more alive today than ever – one that is going through a multiplication of both forms and content, at an amazing speed.

As the President said last night, “Good Journalism Matters”. Therefore, if we are in the business of gathering information, interpreting, and spreading it, then we certainly have more means, now more than ever before, to do so.

Because just as the internet has demolished old ways of doing things, it has also made new ones possible. And there lies, the opportunity.

Good journalism requires that we should be thorough, accurate, fair and transparent. Although the lines separating each of these principles are not always clear, nevertheless they are a useful way to approach quality journalism.

Africa is the continent of the future, and I hasten to add that Nigeria is the trigger to make this so. The forecast for the continent is for strong growth for the next 25 years; at an average annual rate of five percent.

Compare this to Western Europe and the US, which are forecasted to grow real GDP at +1.5% and 2.5% respectively, and the picture becomes clearer.

A rising middle class will increase the target market for mobile phones, DTT and pay TV, just as growing urbanisation will further accelerate this trend.

One billion people in sub-Saharan Africa are expected to have mobile phones by 2023. Digital TV Research forecast the number of pay TV subscribers to more than double in the next 5 years with estimated pay TV penetration of 16% of households by 2020.

As someone said, it is easy to predict the future of journalism. In five, ten, even 15 years’ time, people will still be hungry for news. The one thing that will remain constant in the picture, is good content and good quality journalism.

What is changing, is the way that businesses distribute content, and consumers access them, plus the nature of relationships all along the supply chain. So, do not waver brothers and sisters.

For according to the pioneering computer scientist Alan Kay, “the best way to predict the future, is to invent it”. So, for journalists and broadcasters, the best way for us to invent the future is to invent, adapt and innovate, to stay ahead of the curve.

So, the ball is in your court. Go forth, and invent the future.

I thank you for listening.

U.S. citizen arrested during Vietnam protest still not charged with crime

U.S. citizen arrested during Vietnam protest still not charged with crime

The Vietnamese government has still not charged a U.S. citizen who was arrested there while taking part in a demonstration, but they did allow U.S. consular officers to visit the man last week, the State Department said on Thursday.

Will Nguyen, 32, was taken into custody on June 10 by police in Ho Chi Minh City, where he was protesting the Vietnamese government’s plans to establish special economic zones that demonstrators feared would be dominated by Chinese interests.

Will NguyenCourtesy of Mary Daniel

State Department spokesperson Heather Nauert said at a press briefing on Thursday that, according to their understanding of Vietnamese law, authorities in the communist country conduct an investigation before charging someone.

Nauert said consular officers visited Nguyen at the first available opportunity, which was last Friday. She did not discuss his condition or his treatment while being detained.

“Our ambassador and other department personnel are now engaged with congressional representatives on his case, and we are continuing our conversations with congressional representatives,” she said.

Earlier this week, Nguyen, who is of Vietnamese descent, reportedly confessed on state television in Vietnam, saying that he regretted breaking the law and that he will stay away from future rallies, according to Agence-France Presse.

“I understand that my acts violated (the law)… I regret that I caused trouble for people heading to the airport. I blocked traffic and caused trouble to my family and friends,” Nguyen said in Vietnamese on Ho Chi Minh City Television in footage provided by city police, AFP reported.

“I will not join any anti-state activities any more,” he added.

Kevin Webb, a college friend of Nguyen, said in a phone interview Thursday that Nguyen’s friends and family believe the statement was coerced and staged, based on the way he was speaking. Nguyen’s friends and family had seen the taped confession, Webb said Friday.

Image: Vietnam protestA motorist looks at charred vehicles burned by protesters at a fire and police station in the south central province of Binh Thuan, Vietnam on June 12, 2018.AP

In Thursday’s interview, Webb said Nguyen had not yet been allowed access to an attorney.

“We don’t think that they realized that he was an American citizen when he was detained,” Webb said, referring to Vietnamese authorities. “And so we see the confession as a measure to save face, to get through an awkward situation, from the Vietnamese perspective. They want to justify their actions towards him.”

An email sent to the Vietnamese embassy in the U.S. requesting comment was not immediately returned.

Webb said Nguyen’s sister, mother and friends have all been under great strain having been unable to communicate with Nguyen since he was detained.

So far, they’ve reached out for help to members of Congress — some of whom spoke with the U.S. ambassador to Vietnam and sent a letter to President Donald Trump — and they’ve also met with officials from the State Department, Webb said.

“Everyone has been pushing extremely hard to get attention placed on Will’s case,” he said. “We can’t continue at this pace forever, but we will do what we have to do.”

Nguyen, who was born and raised in Houston, Texas, had stopped in Vietnam for a short vacation while headed back to Singapore, where he is expected to graduate in July from a master’s program at the University of Singapore.

Mary Daniel, another friend of Nguyen, said last week that Nguyen joined the June 10 protest “out of support for the Vietnamese people.”

His family and friends alleged in a statement issued after the arrest that Nguyen was “beaten over the head and dragged into the back of a police truck” after police tried to clear the protests.

The Associated Press reported last Thursday that Vietnam’s Foreign Ministry spokeswoman told reporters at a regular press briefing that Nguyen was “being held for disturbing public order.”

Family and friends remain concerned about an apparent injury to Nguyen’s head. A bloodied Nguyen was seen in an online video being dragged by a group of men. He later appears standing on the bed of a police truck that drives off.

“We’re deeply concerned by videos that show injuries, and the initial treatment of him on June the 10th,” Nauert, the State Department spokesperson, said during the Thursday news conference.

Webb said Nguyen’s “basic needs appear to be met” and that he is being fed. But he added that they don’t know whether he received medical attention for his apparent head wound.

Meanwhile, more than a dozen members of Congress signed letters dated June 15 that were sent to Vietnam’s ambassador to the U.S., Pham Quang Vinh, and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, expressing concern over Nguyen’s detention.

In a statement, Reps. Alan Lowenthal, Jimmy Gomez and Lou Correa, all Democrats from California where Nguyen lived for a period, said they also spoke with U.S. ambassador to Vietnam Daniel Kritenbrink about the case.

And in a letter dated June 19, the three congressman wrote to Trump seeking his help.

“We urge your swift intervention on the detention of Mr. William Nguyen and call for all charges against him to be dropped,” the letter reads.

The White House referred a request for comment to the State Department.

Webb said family and friends met last Friday with State Department officials, who he said expressed their clear concern over the case. But concrete details were not provided about a strategy or timeline for bringing Nguyen home, which has frustrated family members, Webb added.

Asked about this in an email, the State Department referred to remarks from its daily press briefing on Thursday.

As Nguyen’s detention continues, Webb said family and friends have been working hard to ensure his story is not forgotten.

“We feel we’ve done almost everything we can at this stage short of hiring legal counsel,” Webb said. “So I think that is the only concrete next step that I know of that we’ve discussed.”

Webb said they’re all anxious for Nguyen’s speedy return.

“Frankly, if that’s the worst thing that comes out of this — that he has a taped confession that’s been run on Vietnamese state television and he gets deported — I think we’ll all be happy with that outcome,” he added.